Hurricane Information, Statistics, Historical Records, and Tracking Maps...
Greenwich Mean Time (GMT): (zulu) click here to learn more about zulu
Hurricane Conversion Information:
Wind Speed
Knots <> MPH
 
 
Pressure
Millibars <> Inches Hg
 
Saffir / Simpson Scale
Category
Wind Speeds
(MPH)
Storm Surge
(Feet)
1 74 - 95 4 to 5
2 96 - 110 6 to 8
3 111 - 130 9 to 12
4 131 - 155 13 to 18
5 156 + 19 +
 
   
Atlantic and Caribbean Hurricane Tracking Maps (Provided by NOAA)
   
Atlantic / Caribbean Tracking Map Atlantic Tracking Map (Full Basin)
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Hurricane Stats Section Last Updated June 22nd, 2009
 
Top 10 Lowest Barometric Pressures Recorded In Atlantic Hurricanes
Rank  Hurricane Name Year  Category Pressure
1 Hurricane Wilma 2005 5 882 mb
2 Hurricane Gilbert 1988 5 888 mb
3 Florida Keys (Labor Day) 1935 5 892 mb
4 Hurricane Rita 2005 5 895 mb
5 Hurricane Allen 1980 5 899 mb
6 Hurricane Katrina 2005 5 902 mb
7 Hurricane Camille 1969 5 905 mb
8 Hurricane Mitch 1998 5 905 mb
9 Hurricane Ivan 2004 5 910 mb
10 Hurricane Janet 1955 5 914 mb
 
Top 10 Most Intense Hurricanes At Landfall (U.S.A)
Rank  Hurricane Name Year  Category Pressure
1 Florida Keys (Labor Day) 1935 5 892 mb
2 Hurricane Camille 1969 5 909 mb
3 Hurricane Katrina 2005 3 920 mb
4 Hurricane Andrew 1992 5 922 mb
5 Texas (Indianola) 1886 4 925 mb
6 Florida Keys 1919 4 927 mb
7 FL (Lake Okeechobee) 1928 4 929 mb
8 Hurricane Donna 1960 4 930 mb
9 Unnamed (New Orleans LA) 1915 4 931 mb
10 Hurricane Carla 1961 4 931 mb
 
Top 10 Deadliest Hurricanes (Atlantic)
Rank  Hurricane Name Year  Category Deaths
1 Texas (Galveston) 1900 4 8000
2 FL (Lake Okeechobee) 1928 4 1836
3 Hurricane Katrina 2005 3 1500
4 Florida Keys 1919 4 600
5 New England 1938 3 600
6 Florida Keys (Labor Day) 1935 5 408
7 Audrey 1957 4 390
8 NE United States 1944 3 390
9 LA (Grand Isle) 1909 4 350
10 LA (New Orleans) 1915 4 275
 
Most Expensive Hurricanes (Atlantic)
Rank  Hurricane Name Year Category Damage (U.S.)
1 Hurricane Katrina 2005 3 $81,000,000,000
2 Hurricane Andrew 1992 5 $26,500,000,000
3 Hurricane Wilma 2005 3 $20,600,000,000
4 Hurricane Ike 2008 2 $18,000,000,000
5 Hurricane Charley 2004 4 $15,000,000,000
6 Hurricane Ivan 2004 3 $14,200,000,000
7 Hurricane Rita 2005 3 $11,300,000,000
8 Hurricane Frances 2004 2 $8,900,000,000
9 Hurricane Hugo 1989 4 $7,000,000,000
10 Hurricane Jeanne 2004 3 $6,900,000,000
11 Tropical Storm Allison 2001 T.S. $5,000,000,000
12 Hurricane Floyd 1999 2 $4,500,000,000
13 Hurricane Isabel 2003 2 $3,370,000,000
14 Hurricane Fran 1996 3 $3,200,000,000
15 Hurricane Opal 1995 3 $3,000,000,000
16 Hurricane Frederic 1979 3 $2,300,000,000
17 Hurricane Agnes 1972 1 $2,100,000,000
18 Hurricane Alicia 1983 3 $2,000,000,000
19 Hurricane Dennis 2005 3 $1,840,000,000
20 Hurricane Ophelia 2005 1 $1,600,000,000
Note: Damages are listed in US dollars and are not adjusted for inflation.
 
Terms To Know:
Cape Verde Storm: A tropical system with origins coming from the coast of Africa.  These are the long tracking systems, which move off Africa, form and trek across the Atlantic eventually threatening the Eastern Caribbean Islands and the US East Coast.  The Cape Verde Islands themselves are just west off the coast of Africa.
Eye: The low pressure center of a tropical cyclone. Surrounded by the most intense area of the storm and at a huge contrast inside the eye winds are normally calm and sometimes the sky clears.
Eyewall: The ring of thunderstorms that surrounds a storm's eye. The heaviest rain, strongest winds and worst turbulence are normally in the eyewall.
Hurricane: A tropical cyclone in which maximum sustained surface wind is 74 mph (64 knots) or greater.
Hurricane Watch: An announcement that hurricane conditions pose a possible threat to a specified coastal area within 36 hours.
Hurricane Warning: A warning that sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher are expected in a specified coastal area within 24 hours or less.
Millibar: A metric measurement of air pressure.
Storm Surge: An abnormal rise of the sea along a shore as the result, primarily, of the winds of a storm.
Tropical Cyclone: The general term for all cyclone circulations originating over tropical waters, classified by form and intensity.
Tropical Wave: A trough of low pressure in the trade-wind easterlies.
Tropical Disturbance: A moving area of thunderstorms in the Tropics that maintains its identity for 24 hours or more.  A common phenomenon in the Tropics.
Tropical Depression: A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind is 38 mph (33 knots) or less.
Tropical Storm: A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind ranges from 39-73 mph (34-63 knots) inclusive.
Tropical Storm Watch: Is issued for a coastal area when there is a threat of tropical storm conditions within 36 hours.
Tropical Storm Warning: A warning for tropical storm conditions including sustained winds within the range of 39 to 73 mph (34 to 63 knots) which are expected in a specified coastal area within 24 hours or less.
Typhoon: A hurricane in the north Pacific west of the International Date Line.
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